Simple Ways To Eat Beets At Your Home

Beetroots are colorful and nutritious vegetables. Knowing how to eat beets is to cook many delicious dishes from them

Beets, often known as beetroots, are a colorful root vegetable, on the other hand, with their ruby red and sunset yellow hues, are one of the most misunderstood–and most disliked–vegetables. Beets can absorb a lot of mineral flavor from the soil they’re planted in. Some people enjoy that flavor. See it as a mammoth that must be overcome before you eat beets.

Finding a technique to cook raw beets in a way that makes you appreciate these deliciously nuanced vegetables is the key to truly enjoying them. We’ll show you how to prepare beets and incorporate them into minimalist baker recipes so you can enjoy them.

Beetroots are colorful and nutritious vegetables. Knowing how to eat beets is to cook many delicious dishes from them

Preparation to eat beets

Unless you plan to cook with beets right away, you should prepare them for storage when you bring them home from the store. Raw beets that are stored properly will stay longer and have a superior flavor.

1. Cut off beet greens, leaving at least 1 inch of stem attached.

2. Wrap lightly in paper towels, and store in a plastic zip-top bag in the refrigerator for up to two weeks.

Remove the raw beets from the refrigerator and clean them lightly with a vegetable brush to remove dirt and debris before cooking. After washing the beet, prepare it according to how you intend to cook it.

Cooking

Raw beets are wonderfully cooked, roasted, steamed, or grilled in a variety of ways. The trick is to try out different beet-cooking ways until you find one you like.

Remember that both red and yellow beets contain natural dyes and will stain whatever they come into contact with, including your kitchen linens and hands. Take proper care of them. Staining can be avoided with the use of paper towels or cloths. Latex gloves can also be used to protect your skin.

You may use beets in a variety of ways once they’ve been cooked. Cooked beets can be added to salads, made into hummus, or blended into smoothies. You can dice them for slaw, quarter them for a grain bowl, or mash them for a dip or spread. In a galette or quesadilla, their thick and chewy texture is ideal.

Beets are wonderfully cooked, roasted, steamed, or grilled in

Peel the cooked beets and keep them in an airtight glass container for two to three days if you aren’t going to use them straight away.

Roast Whole Beets

Roasted beets have a sweet flavor with a hint of minerality

Roasted beets have a sweet flavor with a hint of minerality. Roasting whole huge beets takes over an hour, so this is a terrific weekend choice if you have some time to wait. If you need roasted beets in a hurry, choose smaller bulbs.

1. Remove extra moisture from beets by drying them with a towel. Taproot should be removed. 2 to 3 medium beets, a little olive oil, salt, and pepper in a medium bowl Toss to coat.

2. Wrap all of the beets in foil and lay them on a baking sheet coated with foil.

3. Roast at 400°F until fork-tender, about 30 to 45 minutes for medium beets and 40 to 60 minutes for bigger ones, depending on their size.

4. Remove the beets from the oven and let cool for 15 to 20 minutes. Trim off stems, and peel off the skin.

Roast Beet Wedges

Cutting beets into quarters or wedges will shorten the roasting time while maintaining the rich sweetness.

1. Dry cleaned beets with a towel to remove excess moisture. Trim remaining stems and remove taproot. Cut the beets into wedges or quarters. Toss with olive oil, salt and pepper.

2. Arrange the beet wedges in a single layer on a foil-lined baking sheet. Roast for 20 to 30 minutes at 400°F until fork-tender.

3. Remove the beets from the oven and let cool for 5 to 10 minutes. Peel off the skin.

Cutting beets into quarters or wedges will shorten the roasting time while maintaining the rich sweetness

Microwave Beets

Microwaving beets is one of the quickest methods to prepare them while retaining a lot of its earthy taste. This beet-cooking method works well with small to medium beets. Large beets may become rubbery on the outside before becoming soft enough to eat on the inside.

1. Clean the beets and place them in a microwave-safe dish. Fill the dish with enough water to cover the bottom. Wrap the dish in plastic wrap.

2. Microwave on High until fork-tender, 12 to 15 minutes, turning once.

3. Let stand for 5 minutes. Remove the taproot, trim the stems and remove the skin.

Steam Beets

Because the beets aren’t boiled out of their vitamins and minerals, steaming them keeps them very vivid. Plus, boiling tiny beets or beet pieces on weeknights is quick and easy.

1. Remove the leftover stem and taproot from the beets that have been cleaned.

2. Cut each beet into cubes or wedges measuring 1/2 to 1 inch in diameter.

3. In a large stockpot, bring a small amount of water to a rolling boil. In the saucepan, place a steamer basket with its bottom above the water level.

4. Place the beets in the steamer basket, cover the pot, and steam until fork-tender, about 10 to 15 minutes for tiny pieces and 20 to 30 minutes for medium and big ones.

5. Take the beets out of the basket and set them aside to cool for 5 to 10 minutes. Remove the outer layer of skin.

Conclusion

Beets are high in natural sugars, but they’re also abundant in vitamins and minerals, making them a nutritious addition to a variety of dishes.

According to a 2015 study published in the journal Nutrients, beets are also high in antioxidants. They have anti-inflammatory effects that can reduce muscle and organ damage. They may also aid in the prevention of blood vessel damage and the reduction of blood pressure.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply